Home

 

F&V Cosmetic Center

The delicate art of blending science & nature.

Offer

It’s all about you!
FREE Collagen Eye or lip Mask with any facial treatment ($15 value) when you sign up for our e-Newsletter!


Your Email (requried)

[x_subscribe form=”6800″]

BOTOX Cosmetic (Botulinum Toxin)

Now with the Botox treatment, get all the wrinkles off your skin. Enjoy the beauty of blemishless skin.

Request An Appointment



Nonsurgical Procedures

Surgery is not the only option that is available. There are a lot of non surgical methods and we have it right here for you.

Contact Us Today

Latest Medical News


UC Davis Health experts to lead national patient safety website

Patrick Romano and Debra Bakerjian of UC Davis Health have become co-editors-in-chief of PSNet ― the Patient Safety Network ― a globally recognized web-based resource for scholarship and perspectives in the field of patient safety. 

Debra Bakerjian and Patrick Romano have been selected as editors-in-chief of PSNet. Debra Bakerjian and Patrick Romano have been selected as editors-in-chief of PSNet.

Romano is a professor of internal medicine and pediatrics and researcher with the Center for Healthcare Policy and Research. He is widely known as an expert on developing measures to accurately assess health care quality and safety. 

Bakerjian, a clinical professor at Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at UC Davis, focuses on patient safety and quality improvement in long-term care, interprofessional education and collaborative practice in primary care. 

Launched in 2005, PSNet is a project of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The site is regarded worldwide as an authoritative resource for evidence-based practices that can reduce adverse events. PSNet encompasses WebM&M, an online journal featuring expert analysis of anonymously reported medical errors and interactive learning modules on patient safety. 

“Our team searches for the most recent research and selects and summarizes 15 to 20 of the best studies, tools, news articles and upcoming activities to appear each week on the site,” Bakerjian explained. “In addition, we review and provide expert commentary on cases describing medical errors and patient harms that have been submitted anonymously from hospitals all over the U.S.”  

All clinicians are invited to visit PSNet to see the expansive patient safety materials and resources the site provides.

One of those cases each month is featured as a “Spotlight Case.” Spotlights are certified for AMA PRA Category 1TM credit and Maintenance of Certification (MOC) units through the American Board of Internal Medicine for providers who read and pass a quiz about the Spotlight. UC Davis Health’s Office of Continuing Medical Education (CME) offers Category 1 Credit and maintenance of certification (MOC) units to providers who read and pass a quiz about the spotlight. Up to 8,000 learners do so every month.

The UC Davis Health team also selects topics for and expands primers on the site, which are short essays on fundamental patient safety concepts.  

“Working with Dr. Bakerjian in a collaborative leadership capacity on this important project is a tremendous privilege and honor,” Romano said. “Our selection reflects the commitment of our UC Davis schools of health to continuously advancing the field of patient safety and educating health professionals worldwide about improving the quality of care.” 

Romano and Bakerjian have assembled an accomplished multidisciplinary team of UC Davis Health faculty and staff to support their work on PSNet, who are all highlighted here. They invite all clinicians to visit PSNet to see the expansive patient safety materials and resources the site provides.

Original Article

Source

Study to test a new way of talking with patients about low-back pain imaging

Joshua Fenton, a UC Davis professor of family and community medicine, has received a $1.4 million, four-year grant from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to test an approach to helping low-back pain patients understand when they do not need imaging tests that increase radiation exposure and provide no clinical benefit.

Joshua Fenton Joshua Fenton

Spinal imaging is commonly ordered during doctors’ office visits for acute low-back pain, even though it is only recommended for patients with symptoms of neurologic deficits or other conditions requiring prompt evaluation. Otherwise, watchful waiting is advised. Given the high costs of low-back pain care ― which exceed $100 billion per year in the U.S. ― assuring that all diagnostics are necessary and useful in patient care has become a national priority.

Imaging requests often come directly from patients, with doctors giving in to maintain patient trust, according to Fenton.

“We want to give physicians strategies for communicating with patients about their symptoms and then doing what is needed ― no more, no less ― to diagnose and treat them safely and effectively,” Fenton said.

The strategies will first be tested with focus groups of primary care providers, and then in a randomized trial with primary care providers and actors portraying patients with low-back pain. The goals are to see if they build skills in encouraging acceptance of a watchful waiting approach for low-back pain and reduce imaging rates among real patients.

“The long-term goal is to give primary care physicians skills they can use to avoid costly and potentially harmful testing while preserving the doctor-patient relationship,” Fenton said.

The study is funded by HHS’s Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (grant 1R18HS026415-01) and coordinated by the UC Davis Center for Healthcare Policy and Research.

More information about UC Davis Health, including its Department of Family and Community Medicine and Center for Healthcare Policy and Research, is at health.ucdavis.edu.

Original Article

Source

Advanced Cooling Therapy Releases New Temperature Modulation Device

Wolters Kluwer Health

JavaScript Error
JavaScript has been disabled on your browser. You must enable it to continue. Here’s how to enable JavaScript in the following browsers:

Internet Explorer

  1. From the Tools menu, select Options
  2. Click the Content tab
  3. Select Enable JavaScript

Firefox

  1. From the Tools menu, choose Internet Options
  2. Click the Security tab
  3. Click Custom Level
  4. Set Active Scripting to Enable

Safari

  1. From the Edit menu, choose Preferences
  2. Click the Security tab
  3. Select Enable JavaScript

Original Article

Source

First-in-the-nation gun violence prevention training program for health professionals established at UC Davis Health

The state of California and UC Davis Violence Prevention Research Program (VPRP) are taking the lead to prevent gun violence by educating medical and mental health professionals on best practices to reduce firearm-related injury and death.

UC Davis Violence Prevention Research Program to expand training for health professionals. UC Davis Violence Prevention Research Program to expand training for health professionals.

Assembly Bill 521, signed by Governor Gavin Newsom on Oct. 11, designates the University of California Firearm Violence Research Center, which is hosted by VPRP, to expand its research and give health care professionals the clinical tools they need to assess patients for risk, provide counseling and intervene when necessary. The bill was authored by Assemblymember Marc Berman (D-Palo Alto, and the Budget Act of 2019 includes $3.85 million for the training.

“This program will be the only one of its kind in the country,” said Garen Wintemute, an emergency physician and director of the UC Center and VPRP. “California health professionals are committed to making firearm violence prevention part of their practices, and we are very excited by the opportunity to equip them with the knowledge and skills they need.”

Amy Barnhorst, a UC Davis psychiatrist who has dedicated much of her career to the issue of gun violence, suicide and public mental health, will direct the training. She is vice chair for community mental health and an associate professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences.

“Medical and mental health providers are uniquely positioned to respond to and prevent firearm-related harm,” Barnhorst said. “Many have asked for more information on when and how to discuss firearms with patients and what to do when patients have access to guns and are at high risk for harming themselves or others.”

The new initiative builds on VPRP’s What You Can Do program. Established in 2017 after the mass shooting in Las Vegas, the program offers specific strategies health care providers can use in their clinics to reduce firearm injury and death. The goal is to help providers get comfortable identifying risk, talk about firearm safety and take action when the risk is imminent.

But experts nationwide believe much more can be done.

In 2017, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported 3,184 gun-related deaths in California, including 1,610 suicides and 1,435 homicides. Mass shootings also are changing the character of public life nationwide. By one report, since the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in 2012, there have been at least 2,260 mass shootings, with at least 2,559 killed and 9,426 wounded. These include the recent shootings in California at Borderline Bar and Grill in Thousand Oaks and at the Gilroy Garlic Festival.

AB 521 supports comprehensive training for a wide range of California providers, including practicing physicians, mental health care professionals, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, health professions students and other specialists.

The center will guide providers in working with at-risk patients, from offering safer storage practices to initiating gun violence restraining orders as well as interventions for individuals with mental health issues. It also will continue to conduct rigorous research to further identify specific gaps in knowledge and structural barriers that prevent counseling and other interventions that can reduce the threat of gun violence.

AB 521 co-authors include Assemblymembers Cecilia Aguiar-Curry (D-Winters), David Chiu (D-San Francisco), Jesse Gabriel (D-San Fernando Valley), Todd Gloria (D-San Diego), Marc Levine (D-Marin County) and Mark Stone (D-Monterey Bay), and Senators Anthony Portantino (D-La Canada Flintridge) and Scott Wiener (D-San Francisco).

The UC Davis Violence Prevention Research Program is a multi-disciplinary program of research and policy development focused on the causes, consequences and prevention of violence. Studies assess firearm violence, the social conditions that underlie violence and the connections between violence, substance abuse and mental illness. VPRP is home to UCFC, the University of California Firearm Violence Research Center, which launched in 2017 with a $5 million appropriation from the state of California to conduct leading-edge research on firearm violence and its

Original Article

Source

Cellular therapy shows promise for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

UC Davis Health researchers have announced promising findings from interim results of a clinical trial for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a rare genetic disorder that causes muscle loss and physical impairments in youngsters.

Craig McDonald presenting the interim results of HOPE-2 trial at the 24th International Annual Congress of the World Muscle Society Craig McDonald presenting the interim results of HOPE-2 trial at the 24th International Annual Congress of the World Muscle Society

Craig McDonald, the national principal investigator, presented early findings from the HOPE-2 clinical trial at the International Congress of the World Muscle Society on Oct. 5 in Copenhagen, Denmark. The researchers tested a cellular therapy aimed at blocking or lessening the usual muscle loss in young people with the disease. It was the first intravenous systemic cell therapy conducted in DMD.

Meaningful results

“This is the first therapeutic to lead to meaningful functional improvements in severe non-ambulatory patients with DMD using the recently validated Performance of Upper Limb (PUL) Measure,” said McDonald, professor and chair of physical medicine and rehabilitation and professor of pediatrics at UC Davis Health. “The consistent benefits across multiple endpoints with this cell-based therapy suggests that this may be an important treatment option for the boys and young men who have this debilitating disorder.”

DMD affects about 1 in 5,000 people – mostly boys – worldwide. It usually becomes apparent in early childhood as weakened skeletal muscles cause delays in milestones such as sitting and walking.

This clinical study assessed the safety and efficacy of stem cells infused intravenously, as well as their impact on skeletal and cardiac muscle function in patients with DMD. Eight participants at the UC Davis site received the stem cells every three months over one year, for a total of four infusions.

Cellular therapy may help

The DMD clinical trial used Capricor’s CAP-1002 progenitor cells. They are a type of adult stem cell that can only undergo differentiation along a specific cell lineage. It means that unlike human embryonic, pluripotent stem cells, they cannot become any cell type. Instead, the primary mechanism of the CAP-1002 therapy is to help balance Duchenne’s serious chronic inflammation problems in patients and thereby maintain or perhaps improve critical cardiac and skeletal muscle function.

Participants received infusions of allogeneic cardiosphere-derived cells made by Capricor. The proprietary treatment consists of a type of progenitor cell that has been shown to exert potent immuno-modulatory activity, reduce muscle inflammation and enhance regeneration. McDonald and his research colleagues are looking at the cells’ therapeutic potential to modify immune system activity to encourage cellular regeneration.

“Over half of the DMD population need power wheelchairs for mobility,” McDonald said. “Their legs and arms lose considerable strength as skeletal muscle tissue is lost. Therapies that address these later stages of the disease can make a tremendous impact on the quality of life for these boys and young men with DMD and lessen the burden of care for their families.”

Collaborations that bring hope

The UC Davis Neuromuscular Research Laboratory runs complex, multidisciplinary trials like HOPE-2 through many collaborations with high-caliber teams of researchers and staff. It partnered with the UC Davis Alpha Clinic for the HOPE-2 study.

The Alpha Clinic is funded by the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM), California’s stem cell agency. The clinic serves as a launch pad for testing novel cellular therapies in a wide spectrum of medical conditions, including DMD. The HOPE-2 study was the clinic’s first cellular therapeutic trial. With this great research infrastructure, UC Davis recruited eight of the 20 patients treated nationally.

The UC Davis Neuromuscular research team — led by clinical research manager Erica Goude and study coordinator Colleen Anthonisen — were very excited to share the interim results of the study. Given the positive findings, McDonald expects to explore a path for approval from U.S. Food and Drug Administration and to launch a confirmatory multicenter phase III clinical trial.

Original Article

Source

The Byrd Takes Flight in UAV Market

Wolters Kluwer Health

JavaScript Error
JavaScript has been disabled on your browser. You must enable it to continue. Here’s how to enable JavaScript in the following browsers:

Internet Explorer

  1. From the Tools menu, select Options
  2. Click the Content tab
  3. Select Enable JavaScript

Firefox

  1. From the Tools menu, choose Internet Options
  2. Click the Security tab
  3. Click Custom Level
  4. Set Active Scripting to Enable

Safari

  1. From the Edit menu, choose Preferences
  2. Click the Security tab
  3. Select Enable JavaScript

Original Article

Source

Perioperative Multimodal Analgesia vs Narcotic Use and Pain Control After Head and Neck Free Flap Reconstruction

Key Points

Question  Is multimodal analgesia associated with reduced narcotic use and improved pain control compared with traditional narcotic-based analgesics at discharge and in the immediate postoperative period after free flap reconstructive surgery?

Findings  In this cohort study of 28 patients receiving multimodal analgesia and 37 controls receiving traditional narcotic-based analgesics, multimodal analgesia was associated with lower morphine-equivalent doses administered postoperatively, better perioperative Defense and Veterans Pain Rating Scale pain scores, and lower morphine-equivalent doses prescribed at discharge compared with traditional narcotic-based analgesic controls.

Meaning  The findings suggest that use of a perioperative multimodal analgesia regimen in patients undergoing free flap reconstruction in the head and neck is associated with decreased opioid requirement at discharge and in the immediate postoperative period and better pain control compared with traditional analgesic regimens.

Importance  An increase in narcotic prescription patterns has contributed to the current opioid epidemic in the United States. Opioid-sparing perioperative analgesia represents a means of mitigating the risk of opioid dependence while providing superior perioperative analgesia.

Objective  To assess whether multimodal analgesia (MMA) is associated with reduced narcotic use and improved pain control compared with traditional narcotic-based analgesics at discharge and in the immediate postoperative period after free flap reconstructive surgery.

Design, Setting, and Participants  This retrospective cohort study assessed a consecutive sample of 65 patients (28 MMA, 37 controls) undergoing free flap reconstruction of a through-and-through mucosal defect within the head and neck region at a tertiary academic referral center from June 1, 2017, to November 30, 2018. Patients and physicians were not blinded to the patients’ analgesic regimen. Patients’ clinical courses were followed up for 30 days postoperatively.

Interventions  Patients were administered a preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative analgesia regimen consisting of scheduled and as-needed neuromodulating and anti-inflammatory medications, with narcotic medications reserved for refractory cases. Control patients were administered traditional narcotic-based analgesics as needed.

Main Outcomes and Measures  Narcotic doses administered during the perioperative period and at discharge were converted to morphine-equivalent doses (MEDs) for comparison. Postoperative Defense and Veterans Pain Rating Scale pain scores (ranging from 0 [no pain] to 10 [worst pain imaginable]) were collected for the first 72 hours postoperatively as a patient-reported means of analyzing effectiveness of analgesia.

Results  A total of 28 patients (mean [SD] age, 64.1 [12.3] years; 17 [61%] male) were included in the MMA group and 37 (mean [SD] age, 65.0 [11.0] years; 22 [59%] male) in the control group. The number of MEDs administered postoperatively was 10.0 (interquartile range [IQR], 2.7-23.1) in the MMA cohort and 89.6 (IQR, 60.0-104.5) in the control cohort (P < .001). Mean (SD) Defense and Veterans Pain Rating Scale pain scores postoperatively were 2.05 (1.41) in the MMA cohort and 3.66 (1.99) in the control cohort (P = .001). Median number of MEDs prescribed at discharge were 0 (IQR, 0-18.8) in the MMA cohort and 300.0 (IQR, 262.5-412.5) in the control cohort (P < .001).

Conclusions and Relevance  The findings suggest that after free flap reconstruction, MMA is associated with reduced narcotic use at discharge and in the immediate postoperative period and with superior analgesia as measured by patient-reported pain scores. Patients receiving MMA achieved improved pain control, and the number of narcotic prescriptions in circulation were reduced.

Level of Evidence  3.

Original Article

Source

What is the ‘side boob’ trend and how can plastic surgery help you achieve it?

achieving side boob with plastic surgery

The most sought-after trend in breasts? Side boob. The look is getting more attention in the media, but how do you achieve it? Here is some background on the ‘side boob’ trend and surgical procedures that can help you acquire the perfect side boob.

What is side boob?

Side boob is exactly what it sounds like – when the side of your breasts are revealed in your clothing. It’s essentially “the new cleavage,” with the spotlight is shifting from the center to the side.

Many women want their breasts to show subtly from the side in dresses, bathing suits, shirts and the like. Side boob, just like cleavage, occurs naturally in some women but not in others. For women who don’t have it may be able to achieve it with cosmetic procedures.

How do I get side boob?

The most direct way to achieve side boob is to enhance your breasts with breast implants, fat grafting or both.

Breast augmentation is a very popular procedure that enhances the size and shape of your breasts. Choosing the right profile and thickness of your breast implant will help you achieve your side boob goals.

It’s important to note that if you have very little body fat and choose a breast implant that is too thick for your frame, or if you choose saline breast implants and they are placed above the muscle, there is a risk of seeing and feeling the edge of your breast implants. This can sometimes be more obvious if you lean over.

Reducing the risk of rippling or wrinkling can be done by placing your breast implants under the muscle, choosing silicone breast implants, and choosing a thickness and profile of breast implant that is more proportionate to your body.

Fat grafting is also a great way to subtly enhance your breast profile. Fat is removed from another area of your choice through liposuction, then it is processed and placed back into your breasts which can significantly improve your profile.

The use of fat grafting to the side of your breast implants is a great way to reduce any rippling and wrinkling that you may have from your previous breast augmentation and give you a more beautiful side boob.

What are your best options for the side boob of your dreams? You can realistically assess your breasts at home, and a consultation with a board-certified plastic surgeon will provide you with the best option for your specific body and aesthetic goals.

The American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) has information about all of the procedures mentioned above. ASPS also offers resources through Plastic Surgeon Match to help you find a board-certified plastic surgeon in your area.

The views expressed in this blog are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.

Original Article

Source

Time-Saving Communication and Care Coordination

Wolters Kluwer Health

JavaScript Error
JavaScript has been disabled on your browser. You must enable it to continue. Here’s how to enable JavaScript in the following browsers:

Internet Explorer

  1. From the Tools menu, select Options
  2. Click the Content tab
  3. Select Enable JavaScript

Firefox

  1. From the Tools menu, choose Internet Options
  2. Click the Security tab
  3. Click Custom Level
  4. Set Active Scripting to Enable

Safari

  1. From the Edit menu, choose Preferences
  2. Click the Security tab
  3. Select Enable JavaScript

Original Article

Source

UC Davis Health nurse named ANCC Magnet Nurse of the Year

NICU nurse Christa Bedford-Mu was named National Magnet Nurse of the Year for New Knowledge, Innovation and Improvement at this week’s American Nurses Credentialing Center National Magnet Conference. Created in 2010, this recognition is given to five nurses annually for outstanding contributions in innovation, consultation, leadership, and professional risk-taking. Bedford-Mu joins Christi DeLemos as the second UC Davis Health nurse in three years to receive this honor.

UC Davis Health NICU nurse Christa Bedford-Mu has won a Magnet Nurse of the Year Award. UC Davis Health NICU nurse Christa Bedford-Mu has won a Magnet Nurse of the Year Award.

Bedford-Mu is a board-certified neonatal clinical nurse specialist and a key participant in innovative telehealth programs at UC Davis Children’s Hospital. She is a lead contributor to Supporting Pediatric Research on Outcomes and Utilization of Telehealth, a tele-visit and telehealth project aimed at improving the transition from NICU to home.

As part of the neonatal team, Bedford-Mu conducts pre-discharge live, interactive video visits with rural pediatricians providing detailed information about complex care. She also participates in post-discharge video visits with families, connecting both in the home environment and the medical provider’s office. This program has allowed for earlier discharge, increased parental and provider satisfaction, and reduced readmission rates.

Bedford-Mu is committed to raising the standard for UC Davis Health partner facilities through subspecialty education that reduces the need for risky transport to a higher level of care. Over the last year, she was instrumental in designing an educational program for new UC Davis Health partners. The program focused on developing a broad range of nursing competencies through individualized educational plans and didactic educational programs with on-site mentorship. While still new, the program has allowed dozens of children to remain at their local facility, allowing families to stay in their homes, near their support networks, decreasing family stress, financial burden, as well as health care costs.

“Christa’s inspirational work illustrates the promise of telehealth to improve access to expert care in a patient-centric platform while reducing costs,” said Toby Marsh, Chief Nursing and Patient Care Services Officer. “She is a pioneer that challenges us to think differently, plan differently and imagine a better way to care for high-risk infants. I hope the entire health system joins me in congratulating her on this prestigious award.”

Original Article

Source

Visit Us Today

Location

2111 Ripple Street
Sanford, MI 48657


Call

812-852-9393


Hours

Monday-Friday: 9am-7pm
Weekends: 10am-6pm


Email